Updated : Apr 20, 2020 in Uncategorized

Walker Turner TA1180B Tilting Arbor Table Saw

This is not actually my saw, but I picked it up and restored it for a buddy of mine. I found this saw on the old woodworking machine hunter’s buddy – Craig’s List, of course.

It came from a sign-maker’s shop. He had used it for years to rip plywood and other materials to make signs. He had used it hard and put it away wet, so to speak.

It had been sloppily painted with a brush, the motor was not original, and someone had hacked the side open to create clearance for the motor to tilt, but the saw was otherwise mostly complete, with no other damage, and it came with a nice Allen-Bradley motor starter and very beefy wiring.

The top looked pretty horrible.

But under the rust, paint spatters, and crud, it actually was a pretty decent saw and ran well.

After removing the table and fence, I first cleaned up the motor and installed new bearings. It was pretty full of sawdust and also had been painted with a brush. I also cleaned the contacts on the centrifugal starting switch. I repainted with Rustoleum Hammeretone spray paint in black. When I stripped the paint off the end bells, I discovered they were cast aluminum, or some type of pot metal, and I decided to just polish and clear coat them. I think it came out looking really sharp.

I had to make a new cover plate for the the for the wiring on the back of the motor, since the original was MIA.

PUT PICTURE OF MOTOR COVER PLATE HERE

I attacked the cabinet next. A couple hours with the angle grinder and paint stripping pads yielded some good results.

I also cut out the ruined side panel and neatened up the opening.

A closer look revealed why the saw had been rocking a little bit on a level concrete floor. One of the rear feet was missing the bottom piece of metal.

I used the ruined side panel that I had cut out to make a replacement foot. It is pretty heavy-gauge sheet steel. I also used that same steel to make the cover plate for the motor wiring. I put a piece of threaded rod through to hold it in place.

My neighbor has a wire-feed welder, so I took it over to him and he made a few small tacks to hold it on. I figured once I ground it down and painted it, it would disappear and look pretty much like the others. Here it is after grinding.

It’s the one on the left in the picture above.

Onward to painting! Because the bottom, inside and outside, had been pretty rusty, I first treated it with rust remover and stabilizer. Stinky stuff, but it gets down into the pitting, preps the metal for paint and prevents it from rusting further. I used appliance epoxy in “biscuit” for the inside and Rustoleum hammered in dark gray for the outside.

Oh yeah, I also put it in a Jet 708118 Universal Mobile Base.

Next came some work on the top and arbor/trunnion assembly. The whole thing was pretty grungy.

I scraped, wire wheeled, cleaned and degreased everything, then painted the underside of the table and the arbor assembly with the “biscuit” appliance epoxy, and installed new bearings in the arbor.

PUT PICTURES OF REPAINTED ARBOR AND TABLE HERE

While the paint was drying, I cleaned up and painted some miscellaneous parts, including the handwheels and the fence.

PUT PICTURES OF PAINTED HANDWHEELS AND FENCE HERE

I then cleaned up and painted the box for the motor starter. I think it looks pretty sharp.

The tag from the front of the machine cleaned up really nicely also.

PUT PICTURE OF CLEANED UP TAG HERE

And so did the cast iron face plate. I was very careful with this – it’s a very thin casting and I was concerned that if I dropped it, it could crack. But it came out looking pretty good.You can see the original color underneath the angle scale tag. That tag also cleaned up pretty well.

PUT PICTURE OF CLEANED UP ANGLE SCALE TAG HERE

You can find documentation for this saw at the Old Woodworking Machines site.

Leave a Reply